An empty Bryant and May match box

by | Price (↓) | Consistency (↑) | 0 comment | 2 questions

Another collectable item related to smoking was an empty matchbox. This had the manufacturer’s logo on the front, for example, a picture of a swan, a picture of a sailing ship, and so on, and sometimes information on the back.

Where and how is it used?

it is part of my collection

What did you or someone else pay for it?

I found it on the street

Why do you want to add it to the museum?

The general rule was ‘if it has been thrown away, it is collectable’. The main exceptions to this rule were comics, for example, Beano, Dandy, Film Fun, Wizard, Rover, Hotspur, and so on. If you did not want to keep your copies, they were useful for swapping with the copies of other boys.
Very popular items for collecting were cigarette cards. At that time many packets of cigarettes contained cards and also many people smoked. So the cards were relatively easy to acquire. Usually the cards had a picture on the front and information on the back. They covered many topics but, needless to say, the most popular were footballers. Cigarette cards were useful items for swapping and also for playing the game ‘faggies’. – In turn, each player flicks a cigarette card against a wall (or other vertical surface) to see who can get the nearest without actually touching the wall. That player claims all the cards and the game continues.
N.B. Nowadays, unless you’re very lucky or you visit many antique auctions, cigarette cards are very hard to find


How was it made?

Is made in a factory

Is farmed

Is mass-produced

Is produced by local cottage industry

Is made to particular specifications

Is craft / hand-made

Is foraged

Is found

Is colonised

Is a service


Materials & Making

Who made or produced your commodity?

a factory worker

Who was paid to make it?

a factory worker

What skills does it take to make it?

using machines

Where was it made?

in a british factory

What does it cost to make it?

no idea

What is it made from?

1. cardboard:
2. sandpaper:

Buying & Owning

Who decides how much it costs?

whoever sells it

Who or what assesses its quality?

Not answered yet

Where is it sold?

in shops

Who or what sells it?

shop keepers

How did this thing arrive from where it was made to where you got it?

lorry

Where is it used?

as part of my collection

Where is it kept?

in a drawer

How and by whom is it cared for?

by me

How long will it last?

limited period

Where will it go when it's finished with?

dont know

What is it worth?

no idea


How do you and others value this commodity?

See the values contributed by visitors and those of the donor. And add your own values to this commodity.

Total times valued1
Positive (↑)Consistency
Negative (↓)Price
Overall Positive29
Overall Negative-24
Controversy26.5 (0 = most controversial)
  

What do these numbers mean?

This data that we have collected over time in our database means nothing without interpretation. A relational database, which we are using here, is technology that enables designers of websites and software to compare, contrast, interrogate and infer relations within data. The act of designing a database is not objective but driven by the agency of its creators and owners.

Within the MoCC Collection data is used to help think through the relations between values, commodities and data. Can we describe our values using sliders and numbers? How do we infer meaning such as controversy from data?

Below is a brief explanation of the some calculations and how these help make decisions about what is shown on the site.

  • Controversy Score:
    (Total Positive Values) + (Total Negative Values)

    The closer the value is to zero the more controversial it is in relation to other commodities. Used to infer that values associated with one commodity divide opinion more than another.

  • Average Value Score (used in the sliders):
    (Total Positive for Value + Total Negative for Value) ÷ Total Times Valued

    Used to infer a collective value associated with a commodity.

How do you value this commodity?

To add your own values click VALUE THIS COMMODITY and move the sliders left and right to add your own values - then click SUBMIT
show donor's original values
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- 0
4 +
- 0
3 +
- 0
3 +
- 0
3 +
- 0
2 +
- 0
0 +
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- 0
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- 0
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- 0
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- 0
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- 0
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- 2
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- 6
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- 9
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Questions and answers

Help to reveal unknown quantities, properties and uses of this commodity by answering this MoCC curator's questions.

Question: does any one collect cigarette cards?

Answers:

Hello my name is Gabrielle and I'm your commodity consultant for today.
Thanks so much for your question- the answer with regard to collecting cigarette cards is, in simple, yes, both historically and today.

Cigarette cards found in cigarette packets began to emerge in popular culture and society in the 1870’s; their peak period being between then and the 1940’s. They were used to capture the “explosion into the 20th Century” of achievements from cars, to flight events to nuclear weaponry. Their purpose was to be collected, containing designs from artists like William Hogarth (see here http://www.card-world.co.uk/collect/). The cards themselves were used to “project and represent images and messages of democracy” (http://www.ebay.co.uk/gds/Cigarette-Card-Collecting-Guide-History-and-Grading-/10000000000792790/g.html). According to the guide, they were a particularly popular collection and past time because at the time, lots of people couldn’t afford or have access to books- they offered a way to see different cultures, places and new and exciting animals (source: http://www.card-world.co.uk/collect/).

Today, these cigarette cards are indeed still collected, as collectable vintage objects. They are both sold and traded in their own rights, as ‘cards’, rather than as a by-product of buying cigarettes stored throughout museums and in personal collections. You can find the ‘collectible’ valuation criteria below…
Mint: Exactly as issued.
Excellent: Clean back and front, including edges, sharp edges and sharp corners.
Very Good: Clean back and front, may have dirty and softened edges and rounded corners. No creases.
Good: Soiled on back or front. Blemished edges, rounded corners and one crease.
Fair: Creased, dirty or with mount damage to backs and possibly some picture surface missing.
Poor: Badly creased, dirty or with mount damage to backs and surface damage on backs and fronts.
(source: http://www.ebay.co.uk/gds/Cigarette-Card-Collecting-Guide-History-and-Grading-/10000000000792790/g.html)

There’s collective cigarette card newspapers, and clubs and you can even join a cigarette card society here… http://www.cigarettecards.co.uk/ or http://www.warwickandwarwick.com/valuations/cigarette-card-valuations. Warwick and Warwick claim to be an internationally reputable cigarette card traders and validation experts, illustrating that yes, cigarette cards certainly are collected.

The modern day collective card industry has also expanded to represent and display images of today; like pictures from films, television shows and sport. Pokemon cards dominate school playgrounds. Perhaps one day these cards, just like your cigarette card, will become represent a vintage upsurge or collectable!

You can find out more about cigarette cards themselves, or see examples of them here… http://cigarettecardinserts.co.uk/story.htm

Thanks for your question!

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on May 21st at 1:37pm

Question: does anyone know where they can be purchased?

Answers:

Hello, my name is Gabrielle and I'm your commodity consultant for today.

I've been doing some research and there's many places you can buy cigarette cards from.

The following links take you to online shops where the cards can be purchased...
http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/Collectable-Cigarette-Cards/47421/bn_2316828/i.html
http://www.preloved.co.uk/adverts/list/3190/cigarette-cards.html
https://www.tooveys.com/cat-overview.asp?CATID=23
As you will see, the prices vary slightly depending on the 'rarity' of the cards, whether they are individual or part of a whole collection, and dependent on what condition they're in. The following condition criteria give you some insight into how the cards are valued and then sold...

Mint: Exactly as issued.
Excellent: Clean back and front, including edges, sharp edges and sharp corners.
Very Good: Clean back and front, may have dirty and softened edges and rounded corners. No creases.
Good: Soiled on back or front. Blemished edges, rounded corners and one crease.
Fair: Creased, dirty or with mount damage to backs and possibly some picture surface missing.
Poor: Badly creased, dirty or with mount damage to backs and surface damage on backs and fronts.
(source: http://www.ebay.co.uk/gds/Cigarette-Card-Collecting-Guide-History-and-Grading-/10000000000792790/g.html)

You can also purchase and see the cards 'in person' at public auctions, like this Warick and Warick one, to be held on Wednesday 20th July... http://www.warwickandwarwick.com/departments/cigarette-and-trade-cards.

I hope you find the cards that you're looking for!

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on May 21st at 1:49pm

Conversation

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