Vinyl Sticker

by | Usefulness (↓) | Beauty (↑) | 0 comment | 4 questions

Three lil kitties sandwiched in a chocolate eclair, about 3cm long and stuck to my laptop

Where and how is it used?

Stuck on my 13 inch Macbook Air on the lefthand side next to the 'trackpad'. Used for personalised and for 'light relief'.

What did you or someone else pay for it?

came as part of a sticker sheet for about £5 plus postage

Why do you want to add it to the museum?

It's coming to the end of it's life and I'd like to remember it.


How was it made?

Is made in a factory

Is farmed

Is mass-produced

Is produced by local cottage industry

Is made to particular specifications

Is craft / hand-made

Is foraged

Is found

Is colonised

Is a service


Materials & Making

Who made or produced your commodity?

NatelleDrawsStuff https://www.natelledrawsstuff.com

Who was paid to make it?

Natelle for her artwork and the factory(?) she used to produce the stickers?

What skills does it take to make it?

CREATIVE GENUIS, printing, marketing, organisation, accountancy

Where was it made?

Florida, US

What does it cost to make it?

not sure

What is it made from?

Buying & Owning

Who decides how much it costs?

Natelle

Who or what assesses its quality?

Natelle

Where is it sold?

On Natelle's online store

Who or what sells it?

Natelle

How did this thing arrive from where it was made to where you got it?

Got shipped via airmail from Florida US to Weston-Super-Mare (I'm not sure where it went in-between)

Where is it used?

to personalise my belongings

Where is it kept?

on my laptop

How and by whom is it cared for?

occasionally by me, with a wet wipe

How long will it last?

18 months or so, unless it gets wet or ripped off!

Where will it go when it's finished with?

the bin

What is it worth?

a little chuckle (nothing now it's been used)


How do you and others value this commodity?

See the values contributed by visitors and those of the donor. And add your own values to this commodity.

Total times valued1
Positive (↑)Beauty
Negative (↓)Usefulness
Overall Positive57
Overall Negative-3
Controversy30 (0 = most controversial)
  

What do these numbers mean?

This data that we have collected over time in our database means nothing without interpretation. A relational database, which we are using here, is technology that enables designers of websites and software to compare, contrast, interrogate and infer relations within data. The act of designing a database is not objective but driven by the agency of its creators and owners.

Within the MoCC Collection data is used to help think through the relations between values, commodities and data. Can we describe our values using sliders and numbers? How do we infer meaning such as controversy from data?

Below is a brief explanation of the some calculations and how these help make decisions about what is shown on the site.

  • Controversy Score:
    (Total Positive Values) + (Total Negative Values)

    The closer the value is to zero the more controversial it is in relation to other commodities. Used to infer that values associated with one commodity divide opinion more than another.

  • Average Value Score (used in the sliders):
    (Total Positive for Value + Total Negative for Value) ÷ Total Times Valued

    Used to infer a collective value associated with a commodity.

How do you value this commodity?

To add your own values click VALUE THIS COMMODITY and move the sliders left and right to add your own values - then click SUBMIT
show donor's original values
- 0
10 +
- 0
10 +
- 0
7 +
- 0
6 +
- 0
5 +
- 0
5 +
- 0
4 +
- 0
3 +
- 0
3 +
- 0
2 +
- 0
1 +
- 0
1 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 3
0 +

Questions and answers

Help to reveal unknown quantities, properties and uses of this commodity by answering this MoCC curator's questions.

Question: I supported a small, independent artist/ business but I got my sticker shipped from abroad, is this ethical?

Answers:

Ooo this is an interesting one.

It’s got me really thinking about ethics and how we define them. If we go by the book (well, by the ethical trading initiative which sums it up quite nicely!), then ‘good ethics’ is about protecting workers rights throughout the supply chain, and the “behaviour of the buying company”.

Doing some research into the maker ‘Natelle draws stuff’, Natelle states how she “designs all products, answer customer emails, pack, and ship orders”. This transparency and chain of production would suggest good ethics- her rights appear to be protected, and she seems immensely happy with her business!

However, I couldn’t really find any information on the production component to the supply chain- where are the materials used for your vinyl stickers from? The vinyl roll for printing, all the components involved in the printing machine, the computer numerical controlling, the ink. To be completely ethical involves looking after all workers in the supply chain- I’m not sure whether this is the case. That said though, Natelle’s fantastic local aspect and reduced worker involvement in her independent business does seem to have a more gleaming ethical picture than lots of big named companies!

Now- does this ethics continue despite air miles? Well, that’s a big question. If we extend the supply chain to your doorstep, we then add the ethics of the postal system (US & UK), of cargo/passenger airmiles, of flight providers and external businesses etc. The ethics involved in the purchase become more murky as the ethics of these groups become stuck to your sticker. The distance may change the environmental impacts of the purchase (from something local, to something with a much greater carbon footprint- you can work out rough air carbon footprint here- http://calculator.carbonfootprint.com/calculator.aspx?lang=en-GB&tab=3).

The concept of shipping alone makes the purchase more un-environmental than un-ethical. But what does put pressure on the ethics is the range of new actors involved in bringing the product from a pretty transparent business, to your front door. To do so involves new ethics- like delivery drivers, postal systems, air traffic workers and so on- which make the ethics trickier to measure. Extra fingerprints are added to the sticker, and rather than a pathway from production to consumption, it becomes a more tangled net with so many players and influence.

This certainly isn’t unique to your sticker though- entangled ethics is pretty much the situation for every commodity we own and rely on. And it’s nothing to beat yourself up about- it's certainly uncomfortable and it makes me question and doubt so many of my own decisions and purchases- ethics is something difficult, and something we can't ever forget or unsee. But being aware is often the most useful, precious and undervalued thing. By thinking about it and asking this question, you’ve really opened my mind to the way that I see and connect things, so thank-you!

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 2:05pm

Question: How are vinyl stickers made?

Answers:

Oh this brings back memories of GCSE D.T. (aka- the subject where I once sawed through a table). Vinyl stickers are images which are printed onto vinyl using a wide-format printer, loaded with digital vinyl paper. They can have shapes cut out of them, usually by die-cutting. I.e.- the same clever machine that’s just printed them onto the vinyl roll then goes back and contours the shapes. Some super clever computer!

V clear description/visual demonstration can be seen here by a San Fran sticker company- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o04FK4w_Mso

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 7:18am

Question: Do you think it's white chocolate or cream covering the strawberry?

Answers:

ALWAYS white chocolate mmmmmm!!

My hideously sweet tooth was devastated to discover a few years back that white chocolate isn't actually chocolate though! It tragically doesn't contain any chocolate solids- http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/28/white-chocolate-what-is-it-even_n_6043862.html. I can't even argue that it's basically healthy- I mean, chocolate comes from the cacao bean, which grows on a tree, which basically means chocolate is one of your 5-a-day right? Argument doesn't hold for white chocolate though... Gutting.

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 7:09am

Question: What're the cats thinking about?

Answers:

Middle cat is worried about the chocolate dripping on his freshly washed pristine white ears and getting stuck behind his pesky collar.
Right-end cat is asleep, dreaming about world domination (*garden bird domination)
Left end cat is 'feline' great and thinking about how 'paw-some' it is to be stuck inside a warm, cosy piece of delightful choux pastry.

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 7:22am

Conversation

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