Time

by | Democracy (↓) | Usefulness (↑) | 0 comment | 2 questions

There are many things in this world that are valuable...work, family, health, possessions but is time, the worlds most valuable commodity outside of health?
Do you take time for exercise and nutrition? Or do you just kill time, hoping that you'll feel fine?

Where and how is it used?

Is time a resource or is time your life?

If it's a resource it's a difficult one, you can't buy it, rent it, borrow it, save it, renew it, or multiply it. All you can do is spend it.
Unlike other resources, like talent, education, or money, we all have the exact same amount of time (in one sense). In that sense it is the only commodity in which we are all equal, in the sense that we all have the same amount of hours in the day.

Or is time your life?

How you spend your time reflects your values?

Either way, no one seems to have enough time.....

What did you or someone else pay for it?

the sacrifices we make to spend time on certain activities

Why do you want to add it to the museum?

we all have time but we may not think of it as a commodity.


How was it made?

Is made in a factory

Is farmed

Is mass-produced

Is produced by local cottage industry

Is made to particular specifications

Is craft / hand-made

Is foraged

Is found

Is colonised

Is a service


Materials & Making

Who made or produced your commodity?

An Egyptian device to measure time (called a horology) dates back to c. 1500 BC. Or was time created by a state of consciousness? or by a God?

Who was paid to make it?

Sir Sandford Fleming who proposed the first world time zone in 1879?

What skills does it take to make it?

Mathematics, engineering

Where was it made?

Egypt? Canada? The Cosmos?

What does it cost to make it?

often minimum wage...

What is it made from?

Buying & Owning

Who decides how much it costs?

the individual? the employer? their situation? their life stage?

Who or what assesses its quality?

everyone

Where is it sold?

everywhere

Who or what sells it?

individuals, businesses, hospitals

How did this thing arrive from where it was made to where you got it?

I was taught time in primary school

Where is it used?

everywhere

Where is it kept?

in watch faces and phone screens

How and by whom is it cared for?

individuals, through priorities and support

How long will it last?

it will vary

Where will it go when it's finished with?

Not answered yet

What is it worth?

it varies


How do you and others value this commodity?

See the values contributed by visitors and those of the donor. And add your own values to this commodity.

Total times valued1
Positive (↑)Usefulness
Negative (↓)Democracy
Overall Positive47
Overall Negative-43
Controversy45 (0 = most controversial)
  

What do these numbers mean?

This data that we have collected over time in our database means nothing without interpretation. A relational database, which we are using here, is technology that enables designers of websites and software to compare, contrast, interrogate and infer relations within data. The act of designing a database is not objective but driven by the agency of its creators and owners.

Within the MoCC Collection data is used to help think through the relations between values, commodities and data. Can we describe our values using sliders and numbers? How do we infer meaning such as controversy from data?

Below is a brief explanation of the some calculations and how these help make decisions about what is shown on the site.

  • Controversy Score:
    (Total Positive Values) + (Total Negative Values)

    The closer the value is to zero the more controversial it is in relation to other commodities. Used to infer that values associated with one commodity divide opinion more than another.

  • Average Value Score (used in the sliders):
    (Total Positive for Value + Total Negative for Value) ÷ Total Times Valued

    Used to infer a collective value associated with a commodity.

How do you value this commodity?

To add your own values click VALUE THIS COMMODITY and move the sliders left and right to add your own values - then click SUBMIT
show donor's original values
- 0
10 +
- 0
7 +
- 0
7 +
- 0
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- 0
5 +
- 0
3 +
- 0
3 +
- 0
2 +
- 0
2 +
- 0
1 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
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- 2
0 +
- 2
0 +
- 4
0 +
- 4
0 +
- 4
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- 8
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0 +
- 10
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Questions and answers

Help to reveal unknown quantities, properties and uses of this commodity by answering this MoCC curator's questions.

Question: How does an atomic clock work?

Answers:

What a fascinating question which, I have to admit, I knew nothing about.

The best answer seems to be here (courtesy of 'timeanddate.com')-

"In an atomic clock, the natural oscillations of atoms act like the pendulum in a grandfather clock. However, atomic clocks are far more precise than conventional clocks because atomic oscillations have a much higher frequency and are much more stable.

There are many different types of atomic clocks, but they generally share the same basic working principle, which is described below:

1. Heat, Bundle, and Sort
First, the atoms are heated in an oven and bundled into a beam. Each atom has one of two possible energy states. They are referred to as hyperfine levels, but let's call them state A and state B.

A magnetic field then removes all atoms in state B from the beam, so only atoms in state A remain.

2. Irridate and Count
The state-A atoms are sent through a resonator where they are subjected to microwave radiation, which triggers some of the atoms to change to state B. Behind the resonator, atoms that are still in state A are removed by a second magnetic field. A detector then counts all atoms that have changed to state B.

The percentage of atoms that change their state while passing through the resonator depends on the frequency of the microwave radiation. The more it is in sync with the inherent oscillation frequency of the atoms, the more atoms change their state.

The goal is to perfectly tune the microwave frequency to the oscillation of the atoms, and then measure it. After exactly 9,192,631,770 oscillations, a second has passed." (source- https://www.timeanddate.com/time/how-do-atomic-clocks-work.html).

You can use a potato to power a clock though- http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Potato-Clock. Perhaps not with the accuracy you're looking for though!!)

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 11:49am

Question: is time travel possible?

Answers:

Of course- Henry DeTamble does it ALL the time in the Time Travellers Wife! And Jodie Whittaker's about to start doing so too isn't she?...

Well, in 'real life', I'm not sure. But, according to NASA, it's possible to travel forwards in time, as long as you reach 99.5% (or something close) to the speed of light.

This probably explains it far better- "Travelling forwards in time is surprisingly easy. Einstein’s special theory of relativity, developed in 1905, shows that time passes at different rates for people who are moving relative to one another - although the effect only becomes large when you get close to the speed of light. If one were to leave Earth in a spacecraft travelling at an appreciable fraction of lightspeed, turn around and come back, only a few years might have passed on board but many years could have gone by on Earth". (source- http://www.physics.org/article-questions.asp?id=131).
So apparently, if you left earth when you were 15, travelling around 99.5% of light speed, you'd only have 5 birthdays, so you'd get home when you were 20. But, unfortunately, your friends and classmates would have had 50 birthdays and would now be 65...

We haven't reached the speed of 99.5% lightspeed yet (what a relief for all those anti-wrinkle cream companies!). Possible yes, but perhaps not achievable, at least in the near future. Travelling back is much harder- we'd need to travel much faster than the speed of light to do so, which really isn't possible.

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 11:19am

Conversation

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