Why are the arms on glasses always too short for my head? Whose head are they made for? Where are their ears?!

Answers

Oh glasses! Let me tell you you’re not alone my bespectacled friend- my glasses have been sat on, dropped, and have a permanent sheen from surviving the dishwasher. But where would we be without them? (I’d most likely be in a hedge- unable to see where I was going)!.

According to wikihow, the arms of glasses measure typical measure between 130 and 150mm from the frame to the point at which they curve to ‘supposedly’ fit your ears. It’s based on the range around average male and female head measurements ‘supposedly’- though it’s always good to be different! Apparently ladies glasses tend to stick around 140mm as a maximum. To find the measurement of your glasses ‘arms’, check out the inner side where the plastic sits behind the ear- there should be a string of three number groups separated by dashes. The last three numbers (after the third dash) should be the length. Without my glasses on and (mixed with some dishwasher scratching), I can just about make out 140. See if you can find yours.

So, the next thing to do, might be to go back to the opticians and ask them to properly measure your head, from the temple to behind the ear, to your vision line. Apparently “properly fitting glasses will not rest on your cheeks or touch your eyebrows. They should stay in position no matter where you’re looking, or what facial expression you’re making”.

Scoping out online web forums, it seems length of arms and ears are a common, but easily fixable problem. Correct measurement should do the trick, but if you’ve got a particularly lengthy nose to ear measurement, panic not- it’s possible to get specially custom-made glasses from ‘edgy’ sounding places like this- https://www.cubitts.co.uk/bespoke (slightly too cool for me!). I don’t know about you but going to the opticians is a nightmare- once I take my glasses off to try on a new pair, I have no idea what I look like, and just resemble a plonker trying to squint as close as possible to the mirror with little avail! So, perhaps online glasses creation is the way forward- you can actually see what glasses you’re buying (though bank accounts may be less impressed!).

Glasses with ears is an interesting one- a quick google search brought up this; https://www.amazon.com/Bunny-Glasses-With-Ears/dp/B01CBX2D76. As dashing as I’m sure you’d look, perhaps not the everyday wear you were looking for. It’s quite popular however to buy glasses with ‘ears’ of sorts for running- rubber ear supports or clip around straps, reducing the chance of flailing them off and then having to feel your way round the rest of the race. http://www.independent.co.uk/extras/indybest/outdoor-activity/5-best-running-glasses-10276837.html . Perhaps this might help with comfortable fitting around ears in the short term though? I’ve got a connective tissue issue which makes my ears super flexible (rolling them up and inside out is perhaps my favourite party trick, though possibly no-one elses!)- so quite often my glasses bend my ears over giving a crooked glasses mad scientist appearance. Perhaps I need to look into getting some of these attractive clip around strips- I’m sure we could start some kind of trend?! Just be careful when you’re googling, because there are actual ‘reading glasses for ears’ which turned out to be really small hearing aids- apparently comfortable and sturdy for active users. Their size means I’d undoubtedly loose them without my glasses though…!

Hope that helps- and good luck with those pesky glasses. If you do throw in the towel with them and find some different fitting ones, don’t forget that you can donate your old glasses here- https://www.visionaidoverseas.org/recycling!

Pleasure finding out this info! Gabrielle

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 26th at 9:19am

Oh glasses! Let me tell you you’re not alone my bespectacled friend- my glasses have been sat on, dropped, and have a permanent sheen from surviving the dishwasher. But where would we be without them? (I’d most likely be in a hedge- unable to see where I was going)!.

According to wikihow, the arms of glasses measure typical measure between 130 and 150mm from the frame to the point at which they curve to ‘supposedly’ fit your ears. It’s based on the range around average male and female head measurements ‘supposedly’- though it’s always good to be different! Apparently ladies glasses tend to stick around 140mm as a maximum. To find the measurement of your glasses ‘arms’, check out the inner side where the plastic sits behind the ear- there should be a string of three number groups separated by dashes. The last three numbers (after the third dash) should be the length. Without my glasses on and (mixed with some dishwasher scratching), I can just about make out 140. See if you can find yours.

So, the next thing to do, might be to go back to the opticians and ask them to properly measure your head, from the temple to behind the ear, to your vision line. Apparently “properly fitting glasses will not rest on your cheeks or touch your eyebrows. They should stay in position no matter where you’re looking, or what facial expression you’re making”.

Scoping out online web forums, it seems length of arms and ears are a common, but easily fixable problem. Correct measurement should do the trick, but if you’ve got a particularly lengthy nose to ear measurement, panic not- it’s possible to get specially custom-made glasses from ‘edgy’ sounding places like this- https://www.cubitts.co.uk/bespoke (slightly too cool for me!). I don’t know about you but going to the opticians is a nightmare- once I take my glasses off to try on a new pair, I have no idea what I look like, and just resemble a plonker trying to squint as close as possible to the mirror with little avail! So, perhaps online glasses creation is the way forward- you can actually see what glasses you’re buying (though bank accounts may be less impressed!).

Glasses with ears is an interesting one- a quick google search brought up this; https://www.amazon.com/Bunny-Glasses-With-Ears/dp/B01CBX2D76. As dashing as I’m sure you’d look, perhaps not the everyday wear you were looking for. It’s quite popular however to buy glasses with ‘ears’ of sorts for running- rubber ear supports or clip around straps, reducing the chance of flailing them off and then having to feel your way round the rest of the race. http://www.independent.co.uk/extras/indybest/outdoor-activity/5-best-running-glasses-10276837.html . Perhaps this might help with comfortable fitting around ears in the short term though? I’ve got a connective tissue issue which makes my ears super flexible (rolling them up and inside out is perhaps my favourite party trick, though possibly no-one elses!)- so quite often my glasses bend my ears over giving a crooked glasses mad scientist appearance. Perhaps I need to look into getting some of these attractive clip around strips- I’m sure we could start some kind of trend?! Just be careful when you’re googling, because there are actual ‘reading glasses for ears’ which turned out to be really small hearing aids- apparently comfortable and sturdy for active users. Their size means I’d undoubtedly loose them without my glasses though…!

Hope that helps- and good luck with those pesky glasses. If you do throw in the towel with them and find some different fitting ones, don’t forget that you can donate your old glasses here- https://www.visionaidoverseas.org/recycling!

Pleasure finding out this info Gabrielle

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 25th at 10:07am
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