My new pair of shoes

by | Local (↓) | Usefulness (↑) | 1 comment | question

They are an as-yet unworn pair of shoes. I bought them on-line earlier this summer. They've sat at home, on the stairs, doing not much in the way of walking. I thought I'd break them out in London this week. They are made by Clarks, an English shoe company, and were manufactured in Vietnam (as I've discovered from the sticker on the underside of the tongue). Embossed on the insole, there's a line-image of the tower on the summit of Glastonbury Tor. I've just been informed (by a helpful MoCC assistant) that Clarks is based near Glastonbury. Probably important to note at this point that Glastonbury is located in England, not Vietnam.

Where and how is it used?

The shoes have not yet been used at all. Box-fresh! As a self-confessed shoe-fetishist I have a bit of a habit of stock-piling desirable items, and then selecting when they'll get an airing...rather than buying on a need-to-wear basis. They will get some miles in this week though. I am going to be doing a fair bit of mileage, walking around a conference, and back & forth across the park to my hotel.

What did you or someone else pay for it?

As far as I can remember, they were reduced to £50. I had eyed them up earlier in the year when I saw someone tweeting about them and they were priced at £80. So, I hung about watching/waiting for a sale. And then, hey presto...I was helpfully informed by an on-line ad. that Clarks' shoes were going cheap.

Why do you want to add it to the museum?

Shoes are an ancient technology, and can be judged the height of fashion. Shoes are a staple product _and_ a luxury item. They are the things that ground us - literally - in the world. And they are the primary means allowing us to move around too. Mostly we ignore the pivotal part they play in our work, leisure and in affording us an expected degree of comfort. Imagining trying to do ordinary things without your shoes is to render life very different indeed. I'm a regular runner, so I suspect that I think a bit more about shoes (and feet) than the average person, and so I'm super-conscious of the job they do (or don't do). They are a must for the Museum because - babies apart - shoes are near-enough a human universal.


How was it made?

Is made in a factory

Is farmed

Is mass-produced

Is produced by local cottage industry

Is made to particular specifications

Is craft / hand-made

Is foraged

Is found

Is colonised

Is a service


Materials & Making

Who made or produced your commodity?

Someone (or a number of people) in Vietnam

Who was paid to make it?

Someone (or a number of people) in Vietnam

What skills does it take to make it?

Assembly of shoe parts and use of machinery designed to do so

Where was it made?

Vietnam

What does it cost to make it?

Don't know, but I imagine considerably less than I paid for them.

What is it made from?

Buying & Owning

Who decides how much it costs?

Clarks

Who or what assesses its quality?

Clarks and the customer

Where is it sold?

Shoes shops on the "high street" and on-line

Who or what sells it?

Companies selling shoes

How did this thing arrive from where it was made to where you got it?

Shipping I would presume.

Where is it used?

On feet, for walking streets

Where is it kept?

in my home

How and by whom is it cared for?

By me, carefully. I will try not to wear them when its raining outside...they don't like like wet-weather wear.

How long will it last?

Hopefully as a result of care (above) a couple of years.

Where will it go when it's finished with?

I tend to keep shoes for a while...but could be donated to charity when I'm finished with them.

What is it worth?

Talk to me when I've worn them for a while.


How do you and others value this commodity?

See the values contributed by visitors and those of the donor. And add your own values to this commodity.

Total times valued2
Positive (↑)Usefulness
Negative (↓)Local
Overall Positive106
Overall Negative-34
Controversy32 (0 = most controversial)
  

What do these numbers mean?

This data that we have collected over time in our database means nothing without interpretation. A relational database, which we are using here, is technology that enables designers of websites and software to compare, contrast, interrogate and infer relations within data. The act of designing a database is not objective but driven by the agency of its creators and owners.

Within the MoCC Collection data is used to help think through the relations between values, commodities and data. Can we describe our values using sliders and numbers? How do we infer meaning such as controversy from data?

Below is a brief explanation of the some calculations and how these help make decisions about what is shown on the site.

  • Controversy Score:
    (Total Positive Values) + (Total Negative Values)

    The closer the value is to zero the more controversial it is in relation to other commodities. Used to infer that values associated with one commodity divide opinion more than another.

  • Average Value Score (used in the sliders):
    (Total Positive for Value + Total Negative for Value) ÷ Total Times Valued

    Used to infer a collective value associated with a commodity.

How do you value this commodity?

To add your own values click VALUE THIS COMMODITY and move the sliders left and right to add your own values - then click SUBMIT
show donor's original values
- 0
13 +
- 0
11 +
- 0
12 +
- 0
10 +
- 0
10 +
- 0
8 +
- 0
7 +
- 0
8 +
- 0
6 +
- 0
5 +
- 0
4 +
- 0
2 +
- 0
1 +
- 0
1 +
- 0
2 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
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- 2
2 +
- 0
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- 2
1 +
- 2
0 +
- 3
2 +
- 4
1 +
- 5
0 +
- 7
0 +
- 9
0 +

Questions and answers

Help to reveal unknown quantities, properties and uses of this commodity by answering this MoCC curator's questions.

There are no questions.

Conversation

Do you have questions about how this commodity is valued? Or want to talk about your own values in relation to it? Share your comments.

nice trainers, what're the grip like?

by LizzieH on August 27th at 5:09pm

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