Marie

by | Freedom (↓) | Beauty (↑) | 1 comment | 3 questions

Five year old female black and white domestic short haired cat. Milk moustache, club foot, fluffy and often smells a bit like wet dog. Sufferer of RBF (grumpy face), lover of Aldi 'meat sticks' and my little ponies. Temperamental moods, will tolerate human company for brushes. Hater of pudsey (her admirer), and cause of scar on my chest. Also has a forked tongue for cutting her tongue in a rubbish collecting lorry as a kitten and still runs inside every time she hears them coming.

Where and how is it used?

She lives at my family home alongside a hamster and a chinchilla. She's used for company, comfort and responsibility - although she would probably say she uses me only for food and shelter!

What did you or someone else pay for it?

She was free, although I gave her owner £20

Why do you want to add it to the museum?

To start a pet's hall of fame!


How was it made?

Is made in a factory

Is farmed

Is mass-produced

Is produced by local cottage industry

Is made to particular specifications

Is craft / hand-made

Is foraged

Is found

Is colonised

Is a service


Materials & Making

Who made or produced your commodity?

Star

Who was paid to make it?

my friend? although it wasn't planned

What skills does it take to make it?

*cough cough*

Where was it made?

in a candlelit bush

What does it cost to make it?

Star's life expectancy

What is it made from?

Buying & Owning

Who decides how much it costs?

The owner - although priceless

Who or what assesses its quality?

The owner, neighbours, the vet?

Where is it sold?

bedrooms in East London

Who or what sells it?

the owner, dealers, pet shops?

How did this thing arrive from where it was made to where you got it?

through Facebook!

Where is it used?

the home

Where is it kept?

the utility room

How and by whom is it cared for?

me! food, love, water, bedding, Ikea chair that was designed to be a reading chair but has now been repossessed by a greedy cat

How long will it last?

12-18 years

Where will it go when it's finished with?

heaven

What is it worth?

not valued in monetary terms by me


How do you and others value this commodity?

See the values contributed by visitors and those of the donor. And add your own values to this commodity.

Total times valued1
Positive (↑)Beauty
Negative (↓)Freedom
Overall Positive93
Overall Negative-7
Controversy50 (0 = most controversial)
  

What do these numbers mean?

This data that we have collected over time in our database means nothing without interpretation. A relational database, which we are using here, is technology that enables designers of websites and software to compare, contrast, interrogate and infer relations within data. The act of designing a database is not objective but driven by the agency of its creators and owners.

Within the MoCC Collection data is used to help think through the relations between values, commodities and data. Can we describe our values using sliders and numbers? How do we infer meaning such as controversy from data?

Below is a brief explanation of the some calculations and how these help make decisions about what is shown on the site.

  • Controversy Score:
    (Total Positive Values) + (Total Negative Values)

    The closer the value is to zero the more controversial it is in relation to other commodities. Used to infer that values associated with one commodity divide opinion more than another.

  • Average Value Score (used in the sliders):
    (Total Positive for Value + Total Negative for Value) ÷ Total Times Valued

    Used to infer a collective value associated with a commodity.

How do you value this commodity?

To add your own values click VALUE THIS COMMODITY and move the sliders left and right to add your own values - then click SUBMIT
show donor's original values
- 0
10 +
- 0
10 +
- 0
10 +
- 0
10 +
- 0
8 +
- 0
8 +
- 0
7 +
- 0
6 +
- 0
6 +
- 0
5 +
- 0
5 +
- 0
5 +
- 0
3 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 0
0 +
- 7
0 +

Questions and answers

Help to reveal unknown quantities, properties and uses of this commodity by answering this MoCC curator's questions.

Question: Do you have to moisturise a hairless cat's skin?

Answers:

Oh the strange, strange sphynx cat!

All I can think of is that moment in Friends when Rachel returns home with what I can only describe to be a big walking bat (or as Ross puts it the ‘inside out’ cat). Watch this fabulous snippet here- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl6Ke0I5gGA (credit- Friends; “It’s not a cat”).

But, inside out, or walking bat, or chicken-skin lookalike, or however else Sphynx cats could be described, it’s hard to think about them without smiling- an accolade this unusual critter should be proud of!!

In answer to your question, yes- you do have to moisturise and take special care of their skin- their skin directly absorbs oils. They need to be handled carefully and bathed to get rid of them. It turns out a very thin layer of short, fine hair known as vellus hair that covers their bodies, but they don’t have thick coats to absorb oils, dirt and so on. Specialists recommend a bath time which would be the envy of any ‘LUSH’ addict- warm water, soft dry towel, specially recommended washes for their skin to get rid of dirt and moisturisers for their bodies and little noses. Tracing a cat forum, ‘Moo-Shoo’ seems like a good, recommended brand. Coconut oil has also received rave reviews as being a cat skin moisturiser (clearly these cats know how to keep up with the trends!!). In short, it sounds like these pampered specimens have a better bath time than I do!! I never thought it’d be possible to be jealous of a wrinkly cat…

Their super thin skin means you’ve also got to sun cream them up on hot days, and soft, non-irritating jumpers are recommended to keep them warm when they can’t protect themselves from the cold.

You can even find ‘DIY’ at home recipes here- http://www.healthguidance.org/entry/13473/1/Home-Remedy-for-Dry-Skin-in-Cats.html.
(For cat moisturises, not for cat curry, obviously…!)

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 26th at 2:42pm

Oh the strange, strange sphynx cat!

All I can think of is that moment in Friends when Rachel returns home with what I can only describe to be a big walking bat (or as Ross puts it the ‘inside out’ cat). Watch this fabulous snippet here- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl6Ke0I5gGA (credit- Friends; “It’s not a cat”).

But, inside out, or walking bat, or chicken-skin lookalike, or however else Sphynx cats could be described, it’s hard to think about them without smiling- an accolade this unusual critter should be proud of!!

In answer to your question, yes- you do have to moisturise and take special care of their skin- their skin directly absorbs oils. They need to be handled carefully and bathed to get rid of them. It turns out a very thin layer of short, fine hair known as vellus hair that covers their bodies, but they don’t have thick coats to absorb oils, dirt and so on. Specialists recommend a bath time which would be the envy of any ‘LUSH’ addict- warm water, soft dry towel, specially recommended washes for their skin to get rid of dirt and moisturisers for their bodies and little noses. Tracing a cat forum, ‘Moo-Shoo’ seems like a good, recommended brand. Coconut oil has also received rave reviews as being a cat skin moisturiser (clearly these cats know how to keep up with the trends!!). In short, it sounds like these pampered specimens have a better bath time than I do!! I never thought it’d be possible to be jealous of a wrinkly cat…

Their super thin skin means you’ve also got to sun cream them up on hot days, and soft, non-irritating jumpers are recommended to keep them warm when they can’t protect themselves from the cold.

You can even find ‘DIY’ at home recipes here- http://www.healthguidance.org/entry/13473/1/Home-Remedy-for-Dry-Skin-in-Cats.html.
(For cat moisturises, not for cat curry, obviously…!)

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 6:37am

Question: Should cat's wear collars?

Answers:

I’m going to say yes. What about if it gets lost?

However, having said that, I know cats can be scoundrels! According to studies, up to 75% of cats will wear collars if they’re introduced to them gradually for short periods at a time (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-karen-becker/cat-collar_b_1470615.html). Sometimes, their tendency to scamper through bushes and up trees does mean collars can sometimes break or come loose, and the cat scratching at the collar is a commonly reported problem.

So, yes to wearing collars, but also yes to microchipping. There’s no way that can get caught on some brambly bush whilst the cat stalks its prey. I’d be gutted to loose a pet and not have any way of getting it back. Apparently only 2% of lost cats in the US are ever returned to their owners.

I’m going to have to stop here before I well up/book plane tickets to the US to go and get all the cats….!

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 7:04am

Question: How much does the average person spend on their cat a year?

Answers:

Interesting question- we were just having this discussion (but about dogs) last week at home! Cats are generally cheaper than dogs, though initial start up spending can be similar-

Rescue cats can be anything from free, to around £50, with pedigree breeds between £200 and £2000. Your hairless sphynx cat in the question above would set you back up to a hefty £1,000. The Ashera cat and Savana cat though have sold for 10’s of 1000’s- to me (a non-cat expert clearly!), they just look like tabby cats with long necks- evidently I’m missing something…! There’s also a pretty pricey cat called the Peterbald cat which I’m including here for no other reason other than it’s a striking resemblance to Dobby from Harry Potter (picture can be found here- https://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/the-five-most-expensive-cat-breeds-in-the-world.html)!

After these initial start up costs (including purchase, pet insurance, inoculations, cat toys, beds that they’ll ultimately shred and other costs- i.e.- the dogs vet bills when the cat has swiped it repeatedly and cut its nose open), cats cost on average anything between £340 and just under £1000. Very helpful break down of costs can be seen here- https://www.omlet.co.uk/guide/cats/should_i_get_a_cat/how_much_do_cats_cost/.

But, even for the most expensive £1,000 ‘running cost’, it works out at costing £19 a week. Surely, for all the money you save on heating by using them as hot water bottles means they’re worth it?!

by MoCCconsultantGabrielle on August 27th at 6:55am

Conversation

Do you have questions about how this commodity is valued? Or want to talk about your own values in relation to it? Share your comments.

what do other people think about the trend towards keeping reptiles as pets?

by LizzieH on August 27th at 5:12pm

Add to the conversation: