Contradictionary

by | Local (↓) | Price (↑) | 0 comment | 1 question

A 320 pg book. "A compendium of conundrums, aphorisms and aperçus. A glossary of capitalist cant and anarchist argot. A lexicon for the lawless."

Where and how is it used?

At home, work and play. It informs our vocabulary and stirs our thought. It also provides amusement for guests as it lives in the loo.

What did you or someone else pay for it?

$8+postage

Why do you want to add it to the museum?

This book is an excellent publication. It's construction, both physical and conceptual is rigourous. It brings pleasure every time we look at it.


How was it made?

Is made in a factory

Is farmed

Is mass-produced

Is produced by local cottage industry

Is made to particular specifications

Is craft / hand-made

Is foraged

Is found

Is colonised

Is a service


Materials & Making

Who made or produced your commodity?

CrimethInc.

Who was paid to make it?

'unionized printers'

What skills does it take to make it?

Research, Editorial, bookbinding

Where was it made?

Canada

What does it cost to make it?

Not answered yet

What is it made from?

1. BOOK:

100% post-consumer recycled

Buying & Owning

Who decides how much it costs?

CrimethInc. and the market

Who or what assesses its quality?

Readers

Where is it sold?

www.crimethInc.com

Who or what sells it?

CrimethInc. Writers Bloc, Salem, Oregon

How did this thing arrive from where it was made to where you got it?

Airmail

Where is it used?

Home, work and at play

Where is it kept?

in the loo

How and by whom is it cared for?

It's given a wipe every few months like the rest of the books by whoever is cleaning the bathroom

How long will it last?

our lifetime

Where will it go when it's finished with?

wherever the rest of our books go

What is it worth?

priceless


How do you and others value this commodity?

See the values contributed by visitors and those of the donor. And add your own values to this commodity.

Total times valued1
Positive (↑)Price
Negative (↓)Local
Overall Positive137
Overall Negative-4
Controversy70.5 (0 = most controversial)
  

What do these numbers mean?

This data that we have collected over time in our database means nothing without interpretation. A relational database, which we are using here, is technology that enables designers of websites and software to compare, contrast, interrogate and infer relations within data. The act of designing a database is not objective but driven by the agency of its creators and owners.

Within the MoCC Collection data is used to help think through the relations between values, commodities and data. Can we describe our values using sliders and numbers? How do we infer meaning such as controversy from data?

Below is a brief explanation of the some calculations and how these help make decisions about what is shown on the site.

  • Controversy Score:
    (Total Positive Values) + (Total Negative Values)

    The closer the value is to zero the more controversial it is in relation to other commodities. Used to infer that values associated with one commodity divide opinion more than another.

  • Average Value Score (used in the sliders):
    (Total Positive for Value + Total Negative for Value) ÷ Total Times Valued

    Used to infer a collective value associated with a commodity.

How do you value this commodity?

To add your own values click VALUE THIS COMMODITY and move the sliders left and right to add your own values - then click SUBMIT
show donor's original values
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Questions and answers

Help to reveal unknown quantities, properties and uses of this commodity by answering this MoCC curator's questions.

Question: Do we only buy things that reinforce out world view?

Answers:

Hi there!

My name is Jenny and I am a Commodity Consultant for MOCC.

This is a really interesting question.

In essence, I cannot see anyone knowingly buying something that would not be contingent with their world views, as they may begin to resent the item for it's production or for the things it represents. However, a lot of the things that we buy, we may not think about whether or not we extensively agree with their production and whether or not they reflect our world views. For example, toothbrushes. There may well be one, but I have never seen a marketplace for 'ethical toothbrushes', where they may use less toxifying plastics and have a lower carbon footprint per item produced, but as there is no apparent market for it, we are unlikely to question it, and unlikely to use that item and contemplate it's relation to our world views.

In a religious sense, a basic example would be how many Jewish people may not buy or eat pork, as this is not contingent with their religious beliefs.

However, with some items, it is easier to reflect on the ethics we consume alongside the product. One example is breadsticks; one thing we may concern ourselves with about breadsticks is whether the flour comes from our chosen country of production, whether it was organically farmed, or who was involved in the process and whether their working conditions and wages are ethical. In this way, we may only chose to buy and consume items which we know are produced organically and ethically, to prevent us from feeling guilty about it's production.

For other items, it is a lot more obvious. With commodities we use to express our self and worldly views, such as clothes, makeup and jewellery, and even household display items, it is usually a lot more important that these reflect who we are and how we view the world. For example, I am a strong believer in promoting small, local businesses, so for me; I love the uniqueness of hand-crafted items, shown by the many trinkets I have around my room. However, I do still buy mass produced goods, too. But just because I buy these, it does not mean that I am contradicting myself. Of course, I would rather all of my items came from local businesses, but where I live and with my frequent urgent need for certain commodities, this just would not be possible.

Another example of how difficult and contradictory a question this is would be to consider my iPhone. I love my iPhone - iPhones are not the most ethical form of communication, and if there was a more stylish ethical phone on the market, I may consider that one, but so far, apple tend to have the majority market in the UK at almost 43% of the market. This is diffcult for me, because it may sound like I am contradicting myself, but just because I am playing into the hands of apple by buying their ethically corrupt products, this does not really reflect on me being a bad person, because I directly cannot change it. The best thing I can do is to make people aware of the lives behing their things and question the ethics behind them. Hopefully, by doing this enough, we can all make a little step towards changing the world and having more products that more greatly reinforce our own personal world views.

I hope you have found this insightful,

Kind regards,

Jenny

by MoCCconsultant on May 14th at 1:01pm

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